Where to RV Camp Along Route 66

A road trip along Route 66, affectionately known as the Mother Road, should be on every RVer’s bucket list. This state-by-state guide lists recommended campgrounds for stays along the way as you pass through some of the most iconic sites across the U.S. 

Airstream parked at a campground in Texas
Oasis RV Resort | Amarillo, Texas – Photo by: Laura Domela

Route 66 RV Campgrounds: Illinois

If you’re planning to drive the entirety of Route 66 you’ll either start or end in the Windy City, Chicago, Illinois. Then you’ll head southwest through rural Midwestern towns with plenty of classic motel neon, vintage filling stations, roadside giants, historic bridges, and more. Keep driving until you hit the Mississippi River and East St. Louis.

Casino Queen RV Park | East St. Louis, Missouri – Photo by: Michael Cox

Here are RV campgrounds along Route 66 in Illinois: 

Route 66 RV Campgrounds: Missouri

Many people consider Missouri’s leg of Route 66—from St. Louis into Oklahoma—to be the heart of the journey. Here, it’s still possible to travel on a decent amount of miles of the original route. Plan to stop at diners, roadside attractions, and plenty of photo ops.

Historic Route 66 KOA Holiday | St. Louis West – Photo by: Mahinui

Here are RV campgrounds along Route 66 in Missouri:

Route 66 RV Campgrounds: Oklahoma 

Oklahoma is home to the most drivable portions of the old Mother Road with plenty of fun things to see along the way. Tulsa is a landmark city on Route 66—plan enough time to visit museums, restored buildings, and historic sites—and don’t miss the iconic  Blue Whale in nearby Catoosa. 

Water’s Edge RV and Cabin Resort | Vinita, Oklahoma – Photo by: Linda

Here are RV campgrounds along Route 66 in Oklahoma: 

Route 66 RV Campgrounds: Texas

The panhandle of Texas is filled with vintage gems, from filling stations to motels and diners. Nearly 180 miles of the old Route 66 run parallel to the new route so you can easily hop on and off. 

Don’t miss a stay in Amarillo, known for the famous 72-ounce steak dinner at The Big Texan Steak Ranch and Cadillac Ranch nearby. If you want a detour, Palo Duro Canyon is one of the best parks in the Lone Star State. Lastly, Adrian, Texas, is the exact midpoint on Route 66: 1,139 miles from both Chicago and Los Angeles—stay overnight here, visit the Midway Point marker, and refuel at the Midpoint Cafe.

Big Texan RV Ranch | Amarillo, Texas – Photo by: Jake

Here are RV campgrounds along Route 66 in Texas:

Route 66 RV Campgrounds: New Mexico

The Land of Enchantment offers hot springs, forests, desert, and mountains, as well as interesting small towns and big cities—the most iconic is Tucumcari, home to dozens of famous landmarks and kitschy attractions. 

Santa Fe Skies RV Park | Santa Fe, New Mexico – Photo by: Jim & his T@B

Here are RV campgrounds along Route 66 in New Mexico: 

Route 66 RV Campgrounds: Arizona

You know you’re entering Arizona when you see the Teepee Trading Post and souvenir shop. Continue along the route to see famous landmarks and restored hotels before entering the outdoor adventure hubs of Flagstaff and Williams, the gateway of the Grand Canyon. Before you exit Arizona, stop in the town regarded as “Guardian Angel of Route 66” and visit the state’s Route 66 museum. 

Route 66 General Store | Seligman, Arizona – Photo: Campendium

Here are RV campgrounds along Route 66 in Arizona: 

Route 66 RV Campgrounds: California

The final stretch of the route takes you through desert ghost towns and ends at the Santa Monica pier. Along the way you’ll encounter plenty of worthy pit stops including museums, diners, restored motels, historic sites, and funky art displays such as Elmer’s Bottle Tree Ranch.   

Pirate Cove Resort | Needles, California – Photo by: Life Rebooted

Here are RV campgrounds along Route 66 in California: